Making Decisions While Grieving 

Making decisions while grieving can be incredibly difficult. You may feel like you’re in a fog, and that everything is happening too fast. You may be tempted to just go along with whatever everyone else wants, or to make decisions based on emotion. However, there are some things you can do to help make the process a little bit easier. In this article, we’ll give you some tips on how to approach decision making while grieving.

Grieving is a process that everyone goes through at some point in their lives. It can be a difficult and overwhelming experience, made even more so by the decisions that need to be made during this time. From funeral arrangements to estate planning, there are a lot of choices to be made. And while it may seem like too much to handle, there are ways to make the process easier on yourself.

Grieving is a process that everyone goes through at some point in their lives. It can be a difficult and overwhelming experience, made even more so by the decisions that need to be made during this time. From funeral arrangements to estate planning, there are a lot of choices to be made. And while it may seem like too much to handle, there are ways to make the process easier on yourself.

How grieving affects the process of making decisions

Grief is the reaction we have to a loss. It’s natural to feel grief when we loss someone important to us.
Grief can be overwhelming and sometimes we can feel like we are never going to get through it, but grief is a process that takes time. There is no right or wrong way to grieve and there is no timeline for grief.

Everyone grieves in their own way and at their own pace. Some people might want to talk about their feelings and others might prefer to keep them private. Some people cry a lot and others might not cry at all. It’s important to do whatever feels right for you and to allow yourself to grieve in the way that you need to.

There are some decisions that need to be made when someone dies, such as whether or not to have a funeral or what to do with their belongings. These decisions can be difficult to make, especially if you are grieving. It’s often helpful to talk to someone else about these decisions, such as a friend or family member, or even a professional counsellor. Making decisions while grieving can be really challenging.

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The stages of grief and the role it plays in making decisions

The stages of grief are typically described as going through denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. However, it’s important to remember that everyone experiences grief differently. There is no right or wrong way to grieve.

If you’re grieving, you might find yourself feeling all of these emotions. Or, you might only experience a few of them. You might even move back and forth between stages. That’s all normal. The most important thing is to allow yourself to feel whatever you’re feeling. Don’t try to bottle up your emotions or force yourself to “get over” your grief.

Instead, give yourself time and space to process what’s happened. Talk about your loved one with others who knew them. Write about your memories in a journal. Do whatever you need to do to help yourself heal in a healthy way.

Grieving is a process that everyone goes through at some point in their lives. It can be a difficult and overwhelming experience, made even more so by the decisions that need to be made during this time. From funeral arrangements to estate planning, there are a lot of choices to be made. And while it may seem like too much to handle, there are ways to make the process easier on yourself.

What is grieving?

Grieving is the process of coping with loss. It is a natural response to death or other forms of loss, such as the end of a relationship, the loss of a job, or the death of a pet.
Grief is a journey that looks different for everyone. Some people experience grief as deep sadness, while others may feel anger, guilt, or numbness. There is no “right” or “wrong” way to grieve—everyone will cope in their own way and in their own time.

There are however, some common stages of grief that many people experience:
Denial and isolation: At first, it can be hard to accept that the loss has happened. You may try to deny it or block it out. This is a Défense mechanism that can help you deal with the pain in small doses.
Anger: As reality starts to set in, you may feel angry. You might be angry at yourself, at God or the universe, or even at the person who died. This is normal and part of the grieving process.

Making decision while grieving- Voice: Author Frank Soonius – Trapped in a Dream

How the process of grief and making decisions are related

Grief and making decisions are actually quite closely related. After all, grief is often caused by loss, which can be the result of making a decision. When you experience grief, you may feel pain, guilt, and suffering. You may question your decision-making abilities and wonder what you could have done differently. All of this can make it very difficult to make future decisions.

However, it is important to remember that grief is a natural process that everyone goes through at some point in their lives. It is not something to be ashamed of or afraid of. If you are struggling to make a decision, talk to someone who can help you through the process.

Making decisions while grieving can be difficult, no matter how strong you are. It can feel like you are swimming in an ocean of emotions and decision making can feel impossible at the time. You have to remember that you could only move forward with your life when making decisions.

Grief is a process that takes time, so be patient with yourself and don’t expect to feel better overnight. Making small decisions each day can help you slowly start to rebuild your life after loss.

Grieving is a process that everyone goes through at some point in their lives. It can be a difficult and overwhelming experience, made even more so by the decisions that need to be made during this time. From funeral arrangements to estate planning, there are a lot of choices to be made. And while it may seem like too much to handle, there are ways to make the process easier on yourself.

How to make decisions while grieving and find the strength you need

If you find yourself struggling to make decisions while grieving, you are not alone. It can be difficult to know what to do when you feel like you are in uncharted territory. Making decisions while grieving can be tough, but by taking your time, seeking out support, and trusting your gut, you will eventually find your way.

You may feel like you are in a fog and that everything is happening too fast. Here are some easy steps you can make:

Give yourself time to grieve.

It is important to allow yourself time to mourn your loss. You may not be able to make decisions right away and that is okay. There is no right or wrong answer, so allow yourself the space to figure out what feels right for you.

Seek out support from others.

Talk to your friends and family members about what you are going through. They can offer their help and support as you make decisions. Join a book club or a community of positive people who have been through similar experiences. They can offer valuable insight and support.

Seek professional help.

If you are having trouble making decisions, you may want to seek out professional help from a counsellor or therapist. They can help you work through your grief and make decisions that are best for you.

Trust your gut.

You know yourself best, so trust your instincts when making decisions. If something doesn’t feel right, don’t do it. In the end, you will know what is best for you. Follow your instincts and go with what feels right.

Take your time.

There is no rush to make decisions while grieving. Take the time you need to figure out what is best for you. You may feel like you’re not thinking clearly, and that’s completely normal. It’s important to give yourself time to grieve, and to make decisions when you’re ready.

If possible, it may be helpful to talk to someone who can offer impartial advice. Ultimately, though, the decision is yours, and you’ll need to do what feels right for you.

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Sharon Rosenbloom

A Counsellor & Psychotherapist, Bereavement, grief & loss specialist, Sharon Rosenbloom is the author of Widowed with Kids and supports bereaved widows & widowers through deep pain and sadness to rebuild their lives in healthy ways

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